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What to expect in Tanga

What to expect in Tanga

What to expect in Tanga |  Tanga – Safari City|  Best Hotels in Tanga | Top wildlife tours from Tanga | Flight deeals from Tanga | Tanga City Guide  | Tanga Day Tours | Tanzania Travel Guide |Tours to Serengeti from Tanga| Tours to Ngorongoro from Tanga|

What to expect in Tanga

Electricity

Tanzania is a Third World country and is prone to rolling blackouts.  Most hotels have generators, but they may not operate 24 hours a day.  Some stores do not have generators, so cold drinks and ice may not be plentiful all the time.

We recommend keeping a headlamp or flashlight near your bed for nighttime bathroom visits.  Charge your batteries in the early evening and in the mornings when electricity is more dependable.  Bring multiple power converters if you have a lot of batteries to charge.

Bottled Water

Always use bottled water for drinking and brushing your teeth.  Hotels will have bottled water available, but it will be cheaper at a store.  You may also want to bring a Steripen or filter if you don’t want to buy bottled water all the time to save money and the environment.

Africa time

Life in Tanzania just moves slower than some Westerners are used to.  Be prepared to wait.

Selling hassles

There are many people in Tanga trying to make a living and barely scraping by.  They may hassle you buy things from them.  Be firm and don’t let it upset you.  Learning some Swahili can also help.

Customer service

Like many places in the world, customer service at hotels, restaurants, and shops vary greatly.  Dodoma tends to be slower and less helpful than what some people are used to.

Internet

The Internet in Tanga can be very slow and very expensive.  The further away you get from a major town, the slower and more expensive it gets.

Hotel charges

When you order drinks, food, Internet, laundry, or other services at a hotel, they write the charge down on a slip of paper and put it in the “box” for your room.  They will add these up when you check out.  Look carefully at these slips to make sure they are all correct.

ATMs/credit cards

ATMs are available in Tanga, but they do not always work.  Credit Cards are accepted at larger hotels, stores, and restaurants, but sometimes they are not.  How’s that for uncertainty?!  Check with the hotel/restaurant ahead of time to budget your cash correctly, and bring more cash than you think you need.

Tipping

 Staff are paid salary, but tips are greatly appreciated.  Hotels have a tip box to cover all staff at the hotel.

Safety

If you are in busy areas of town or on safari during the day, you are generally safe.  It is recommended that you keep your money well hidden, do not bring valuables, and do not go out at night alone.

Slow Food

Restaurants in Tanga can serve lunch and dinner very slow.  It can take up to an hour for food to be served after you order.  If you are eating at your hotel, consider ordering ahead of time.  If you are in a hurry, find a buffet or go to a coffee shop, which is faster.  Or, just be prepared to relax and wait.

Culture advice

While we want you to have the best time you can on your trek, it is important to be respectful of the culture wherein you are traveling. Expressions of affection, such as kissing, holding hands, etc. in public are heavily frowned upon. It is recommended that you act in a reserved manner when in public with your spouse regardless of gender or sexuality. 

Swahili Crash Course:

In Tanga, a little Swahili goes a long way! For many Tanzanians, Swahili is actually their second language and their tribal language is their mother tongue (for many of the people from the Dodoma region region, this is the Gogo’s language). {what to expect in Tanga}

This means that in Swahili, unlike a lot of European languages, pronunciation and accent are much less important and you should feel confident that if you at least try, people will understand and be very pleased that you have tried to communicate in their national language! {what to expect in Tanga}

Below is a guide to some key words and phrases that you may want to try while in Tanzania:

Jambo – This is not true Kiswahili. If you say this to a Tanzanian they will most likely reply
‘Jambo’ and then speak to you in English!
Mambo – This is the informal greeting that you should use with people around your own age
Poa! – Means ‘cool!’, and should be said with emphasis! It is the standard response to the greeting ‘mambo’
Safi – An alternative response to ‘Poa’. It’s literal meaning is ‘clean’.
Habari? – A more formal greeting, meaning ‘how are things?’
Nzuri – Means ‘good’. This is the common response to the greeting ‘habari?’
Shikamoo – Respectful greeting, used when greeting older people. Children in Tanzania may
greet you with this word.
Marahaba – The response to shikamoo
Ahsante – Thank you
Leo – Today
Kesho – Tomorrow
Jina Langu…. – My name is…
Jina lako nani? – What is your name?
Nina Njaa – I am hungry
Nina Kiu – I am thirsty
Bia moja tafadali – A beer please
Bia nyingine tafadali – Another beer please!
Naskia mbaya – I feel bad
iko wapi? – Where is (the) …..?
Sitaki ahsante – I don’t need it, thanks
Hapana ahsante – No thanks

More about Tanga Travel Guide:

 

Planning your trip? Whether you’re looking for things to do in Tanga such as events and attractions, key traveller information to make your Tanga visit run smoothly or are planning where to stay in Tanga, you’ll find everything you need for your Tanga holiday on Our Website. Tanga Travel guide has the information about latest events not to miss while you visit Tanga – there’s always something going on, so don’t miss out on the latest exhibitions, shows and more on your trip Tanga

Discover the best day trips from Tanga  or other Tanzania’s Cities. If you’re here as a family, you’ll find plenty of things to do in Dar-Es-Salaam  with kids and find suitable accommodation such as Tanga holiday apartments. Whether you’re looking for the best weekend breaks in Tanzania or planning a longer holiday in, you can be sure you’ll find all the information you need. 

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